violence

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17 year old Christopher Roupe is dead after a police officer shot and killed him, mistaking a Wiimote in his hand for a gun. The officer was attempting to serve a warrant to the boy's father, and claims Roupe pointed a gun at her when he answered the door. It turns out that gun was a Wiimote. The officer is currently on administrative leave, and Roupe's family has hired an attorney.

Game of thrones memes season 5 George RR Martin Explains all the violence against women.
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Entertainment Weekly spoke to Game of Thrones author George R. R. Martin about why all the women in his books and the television show seem to suffer so much violence. It certainly has led to raised tempers over this season's treatment of Sansa Stark.

His comments below probably won't soothe any sore feelings...

The books reflect a patriarchal society based on the Middle Ages. The Middle Ages were not a time of sexual egalitarianism. It was very classist, dividing people into three classes. And they had strong ideas about the roles of women. One of the charges against Joan of Arc that got her burned at the stake was that she wore men's clothing—that was not a small thing. There were, of course, some strong and competent women. It still doesn't change the nature of the society. And if you look at the books, my heroes and viewpoint characters are all misfits. They're outliers. They don't fit the roles society has for them. They're 'cripples, bastards, and broken things'—a dwarf, a fat guy who can't fight, a bastard, and women who don't fit comfortably into the roles society has for them (though there are also those who do—like Sansa and Catelyn).

"Now there are people who will say to that, 'Well, he's not writing history, he's writing fantasy—he put in dragons, he should have made an egalitarian society.' Just because you put in dragons doesn't mean you can put in anything you want. If pigs could fly, then that's your book. But that doesn't mean you also want people walking on their hands instead of their feet. If you're going to do [a fantasy element], it's best to only do one of them, or a few. I wanted my books to be strongly grounded in history and to show what medieval society was like, and I was also reacting to a lot of fantasy fiction. Most stories depict what I call the 'Disneyland Middle Ages'—there are princes and princesses and knights in shining armor, but they didn't want to show what those societies meant and how they functioned...

I'm writing about war, which what almost all epic fantasy is about. But if you're going to write about war, and you just want to include all the cool battles and heroes killing a lot of orcs and things like that and you don't portray [sexual violence], then there's something fundamentally dishonest about that. **, unfortunately, is still a part of war today. It's not a strong testament to the human race, but I don't think we should pretend it doesn't exist.


There. Feel better?

hatred news violence Video Game Coverage - 8356876544
Via Gamona
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Gamona conducted an interview with the developers of Hatred, which you might remember as the one that lets you just kill innocent people, mass shooting style. Loads of gamers, including many of you felt at best uncomfortable with the premise, and at worst deeply offended by it. When asked about the backlash, the developers had this to say:

gamona: A lot of gamers are worried, that Hatred might be exactly the kind of game, that gives the mainstream press the fuel to brand all gamers as violence loving, rough and aggressive people. Do you understand those concerns?

Jarosław Zieliński: No, they're simply exaggerating. Let's face it - most games are about killing, we're just telling it straight. There is also no simple, plain evidence that games are pushing people to go on a killing spree. Such controversy as ours happened before and will happen again. And we gamers and developers are still standing here, aren't we?


gamona: What would you say to someone who lost a loved one in a mass shooting and feels hurt by your game, who can't understand how anyone can develop a game where the player is supposed to shoot as many innocent people as possible?

Jarosław Zieliński: Innocent virtual people. That's the main point. Nobody get's harmed by our game. Anyway - war is a terrible experience for all soldiers out there, what would you say to them while playing Battlefield? But the difference is that soldiers are tough guys, not some moaning p**sies, so they don't complain about their experiences being reference for virtual entertainment. Back to the beginning of your question: I'm really sorry for anyone who has lost beloved ones, but it doesn't have anything to do with our game.

You can read the rest of the interview here, if you're interested.

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The Fjords' latest music video for the song "All In" brings 80s nostalgia and nightmares to life when one kid's NES becomes a real weapon, leading the boy on a rampage sure to cause a stir in the media.  

Here's what the band and video director had to say about it:

First off, we made the video bonding over our shared nostalgic love for all things 80s. It is where we spent our childhoods, and also formed the onset of the digital age. The music video is ambiguous when it comes to drawing a line between reality and fantasy. Where the fantastical aspect ends and reality takes over, is up to the individual viewer. Thematically you have the smaller, personal story - which is the young kid dealing with his oppressors. On a larger scale, we wanted to shed light on the incredible speed of technological developments, both in online social networks, gaming, TV, etc, and our place in it, as humans. We´re living amidst the biggest social experiment to date, and ethical boundaries can get blurry when we´re in the thick of it.


Warning: the video itself features some pretty grim violence, but I can't say I don't enjoy the idea of game cartridges as different weapon/ammo types.  


news-controversial-x-men-apocalypse-poster-bad-reactions-from-people
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Rose McGowan, an American actress released the following statement regarding her general disapproval of the X-Men: Apocalypse poster:

‘There is a major problem when the men and women at 20th Century Fox think casual violence against women is the way to market a film.'

She went on to wrap up her interview with Hollywood Reporter, regarding the matter, with:

"I’ll close with a text my friend sent, a conversation with his daughter. It follows: ‘My daughter and I were just having a deep discussion on the brutality of that hideous X-Men poster yesterday. Her words: 'Dad, why is that monster man committing violence against a woman?' This from a 9-year-old. If she can see it, why can’t Fox?"

The poster, as you can see from above depicts the villain Apocalypse essentially choking the living sh*t out of Mystique. McGowan's not the only one to step forward to express some outrage. The internet reactions are already running amok, check 'em out below. Because if you're like me, you probably had no idea who the heck Rose McGowan was..






What do you guys make of all this?