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By Unknown
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From the article:

Valve's added an option for developers and publishers to disallow cross-region gifting and trading. In addition to the obvious ramifications, this may pull the rug out from people who use those features to get around arbitrarily raised regional pricing and/or censorship.

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Via: Google Cache
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Provided they're on the same wifi network, Valve's new Steam Link will allow you to stream your Steam library to your TV so you can play from the comfort of your couch. The listing for the Steam Link has disappeared from the Steam store, but you can view Google's cache of it here.  The device is priced at $50 and launches this November.

Via: Steam
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Hey, do you own Alan Wake on Steam? Go check it out, because you've just received a bunch of free bonus content. You'll find behind the scenes videos, concept art, set photos, the full script of Alan Wake plus The Writer and The Signal, Mr. Scratch videos, radio shows and manuscript pages. Best of all, there are two graphic novels, Night Springs and Psycho Thriller, included in this free DLC that should have just automatically updated with your game.

Via: Valve
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The official Steam Controller is headed for the wild!  



The Steam Controller features dual trackpads, HD haptic feedback, dual-stage triggers, back grip buttons, gyroscope and accelerometer sensors, and fully-customizable control schemes.  It has a wireless range of about fifteen feet with the option to use it wired, and up to 80 hours of play on a pair of AA batteries. 

Want to buy one?  You can pre-order a Steam Controller for $49.99 here.  A limited set of controllers will be shipped out on October 16th, with a wide release to follow.  

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By Unknown
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Seriously, Valve, you're beginning to make Steam look more and more like Origin every day.

Valve rolled out its pay-for-mods service on Thursday to universal ire from the PC gaming community. In theory, the system is less dubious, if it weren't for the fact that Valve will pocket a massive percentage of the mod charge, leaving the actual modders with precious little profit to their name.

Let's say a modder makes a Skyrim mod that they want to charge $4.99 for. Setting aside the fact that DLC microtransactions are already a plague on the gaming industry, the maker of said Skyrim will only ever get $1.25 for their efforts, while the remaining $3.74 goes straight to Valve for doing no work whatsoever.

This system also introduces an endless quagmire of problems for modders who use elements of other people's mods to make their own. Case in point: the Skyrim fishing mod made by Chesko. As it turns out, Chesko used elements of an idle character animations mod made by Fore. So, that means that Fore is entitled to a percentage of the profits from Chesko's mod on top of Valve's already egregious 75% cut, right? If so, what percentage does Fore get?

As you can see, the whole system quickly becomes a mess, seriously curtailing the resources of modders like Chesko, and infringing on the intellectual property rights of Fore. No matter what happens though, Valve wins and we lose. Such a sleazy cash grab is uncharacteristic of our lord Gaben, but some say it was bound to happen eventually. As Harvey Dent once said, "something something die a hero, something something the villain."