batgirl

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Jenna Malone is in Batman vs Superman, but no one is quite sure who she's playing. She may be Batgirl, and the internet mocked up this art to show us all how awesome that would be.

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We've known that Hunger Games star Jena Malone is in, and dyed her hair red for, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice for a while, but DC and Warner Bros. still haven't revealed who she's playing.

Based on her age and the shade of her new hair, many assumed that she'd be playing the first female Robin, Carrie Kelley.



Now Latino Review is reporting that they've heard different. Instead of a gender swapped boy wonder, their sources are suggesting Malone will play Barbara Gordon. The daughter of Commissioner Gordon, Barbara is the original Batgirl, but we doubt that's the version of the character Malone will be playing.



Based on the mood and tone of Zack Snyder's take on Batman, we have to assume the movie will take a darker route, so you should get ready to meet Oracle, the identity Gordon assumes after becoming paralyzed. In Moore's The Killing Joke, Gordon is shot through the spine and loses the use of her legs. In order to continue her crime fighting career, she becomes Batman's eyes and ears as Oracle, the hacker and computer expert.




 

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Batgirl has come a along way since being paralyzed in 1988. In the controversial, but beloved book by Alane Moore and Brian Bolland, The Killing Joke, The Joker paralyzes and sexually assaults Barbara Gordon (Batgirl) hoping to break her father, Comissioner Jim Gordon, and turn him bad (a la Harvey Dent). It's a seminal book for The Joker, and has become beloved by fans, and it might deserve the praise, if it didn't make such a dumb move.

Paralyzing Batgirl is one of the founding examples of Gail Simone's 'Women in Refrigerators' trope, in which a female character is killed, maimed or dis-empowered in order to drive a male heroes story. When Barbara Gordon is shot, the character was literally thrown away to prove the extent to which Comissioner Gordon is a bad-ass. If it weren't for the work of John Ostrander and Kim Yale, Batgirl might have stayed there, instead of becoming the fan favorite Oracle.

On top of all that, the cover barely resembles The Killing Joke at all, rather it heightens and embellishes:




The tone shift in putting Barbara in her Batgirl uniform and crying in The Joker's clutches only heightens her dis-empowerment. Ultimately, the Batgirl on this cover, is not the same character, Cameron Stewart, Brenden Fletcher, and Babs Tarr create every month.

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