playstation

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How quickly the time goes by, especially when you're playing video games.

Over at the Playstation Blog

they've begun celebrating the landmark anniversary of the first Playstation launch in America, which happened 20 years ago Sept. 9.

Those were exciting and pioneering times for all of us: new technology, the arcade experience in the home, and no guarantee that we would still be around come the turn of the century –- or sooner. Exciting times indeed.

But we did make it. And thanks to the dedication and passion of the greatest gaming community of all time, the PlayStation Nation, we are celebrating the twentieth birthday of the original PlayStation system, which officially launched in North America on September 9th, 1995. At its launch, PlayStation was a stylish, powerful, developer-friendly game console that popularized polygonal 3D graphics and CD playback of games and music.



Do you have any memories of that launch? Any favorite PS1 games?

video game news new horizons pluto probe cpu playstation
Via: The Verge
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Surely you've seen all the stuff going around about Pluto after New Horizons provided us with the clearest shot we've ever had of the dwarf planet, but did you know the CPU powering the New Horizons probe is the same CPU that once powered the ORIGINAL PLAYSTATION CONSOLE? We're talking about the PS1 here, the console that brought you this:



this:


and this:


NASA launched New Horizons in 2006, so they could have used at least a PS2 equivalent CPU, but I guess NASA just likes to keep it classic.

Via: dizzle521
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Back in the early 1990s, Nintendo and Sony teamed up to make a video game console combining Nintendo's Super Nintendo technology with Sony's Compact Discs. It was the original PlayStation. After the collaboration fell through, Sony moved forward with making the PlayStation we know now, but dizzle521 has one of the original protoypes for the canceled Nintendo Playstation. It's an impressive piece of video game history.

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