Valve Introduces a System That Allows Steam Workshop Modders to Charge for Their Mods, With Valve Pocketing 75% of the Profits

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Seriously, Valve, you're beginning to make Steam look more and more like Origin every day.

Valve rolled out its pay-for-mods service on Thursday to universal ire from the PC gaming community. In theory, the system is less dubious, if it weren't for the fact that Valve will pocket a massive percentage of the mod charge, leaving the actual modders with precious little profit to their name.

Let's say a modder makes a Skyrim mod that they want to charge $4.99 for. Setting aside the fact that DLC microtransactions are already a plague on the gaming industry, the maker of said Skyrim will only ever get $1.25 for their efforts, while the remaining $3.74 goes straight to Valve for doing no work whatsoever.

This system also introduces an endless quagmire of problems for modders who use elements of other people's mods to make their own. Case in point: the Skyrim fishing mod made by Chesko. As it turns out, Chesko used elements of an idle character animations mod made by Fore. So, that means that Fore is entitled to a percentage of the profits from Chesko's mod on top of Valve's already egregious 75% cut, right? If so, what percentage does Fore get?

As you can see, the whole system quickly becomes a mess, seriously curtailing the resources of modders like Chesko, and infringing on the intellectual property rights of Fore. No matter what happens though, Valve wins and we lose. Such a sleazy cash grab is uncharacteristic of our lord Gaben, but some say it was bound to happen eventually. As Harvey Dent once said, "something something die a hero, something something the villain."

Explore a Drowned City in Submerged

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Submerged drops you into an unknown drowned city by boat, with a sick brother who needs to be nursed back to health.  You'll climb buildings and find hidden caches of supplies you'll need to help him while exploring this mysterious city.  The game uses Unreal Engine 4, and is designed to explore without the pressure of failure-- explore at your own pace without worrying about death, and learn the secrets of the city and your character.

Observe the Awkwardness of Custom Move Mewtwo

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Mewtwo has no official special moves in Super Smash Bros for Wii U/3DS, but you can hackily achieve them through the use of Miis.  In order to do it, you have to download a Mii not created on your system, then select it for play, deselect it, and select Mewtwo.  Mewtwo inherits that Mii's custom moves, but since this isn't supposed to happen things get pretty glitchy. 




The Conker Pack and Community Creations Launch Today in Project Spark

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A select few community members were given early access to Project Spark's Conker content, and they made some pretty awesome stuff: there's a Halo multiplayer arena, nostalgic recreations of classic Conker levels, and even a tower defense game.  All these community creations, plus the assets used to make them and Conker's Big Reunion launch today for Project Spark.

This Mad Max Game Doesn't Look Half Bad

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Mad Max looks to have a heavy focus on rhythmic melee (think Batman and Shadow of Mordor) and vehicular combat with an open world and plenty to explore.  The game takes your character through the Wasteland while trying to rebuild your perfect car, kicking ass along the way.  

Mad Max comes out September 1, 2015 on PS4, Xbox One, and PC.